News


Braintree board member, and CEO, express concern over U.S. 30 project

February 20, 2017
by Emily Dech, richlandsource.com
The Ohio Department of Transportation is conducting a public meeting Wednesday, Feb. 22 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the United Steelworkers Union Hall for the proposed eastern portion of the U.S. 30 project in Mansfield."I think the way it's drawn out now could be a real problem for the city, especially the north end," said John Siegenthaler of Lind Media Company. Bob Cohen, who has attended several ODOT meetings, echoed Siegenthaler's concern.


























Read more: Braintree board member, and CEO, express concern over U.S. 30 project URL: http://www.richlandsource.com/news/prominent-mansfield-business-leaders-express-concern-over-u-s-project/article_0c34fabe-f6b8-11e6-952e-033ea81d393b.html


John L. Siegenthaler has been elected to the Board of Directors of both Mechanics Financial Corporation and Mechanics Bank to replace his father, retiring director, John H. Siegenthaler.According to Mark E. Masters, President, “We owe John H. Siegenthaler our sincere thanks and gratitude for his dedication to Mechanics, serving our company with distinction for approximately 46 years.”

John L. Siegenthaler has been elected to the Board of Directors of both Mechanics Financial Corporation and Mechanics Bank to replace retiring director, John H. Siegenthaler.According to Mark E. Masters, President, “We owe John H. Siegenthaler our sincere thanks and gratitude for his dedication to Mechanics, serving our company with distinction for approximately 46 years.”Following his retirement, John H. was elected as Director Emeritus.John L. Siegenthaler, fourth generation board member and son of John H. Siegenthaler, is a lifelong resident of Mansfield and a graduate of Denison University. In 1991, John L. founded Lind Outdoor Advertising Company which, after experiencing significant growth, became Lind Media Company and now operates approximately 1,400 billboards across Ohio and Indiana.

Read more: Braintree board member John Siegenthaler joins Mechanics Bank board URL: http://www.richlandsource.com/business/john-l-siegenthaler-joins-board-of-directors-at-mechanics-bank/article_7d8cd4dc-f20f-11e6-acb6-67d144da3cbf.html


Dan Collins has built a national waste-management business right in the middle of downtown Akron — without a bit of mess, smell or even truck traffic. He and his team of software engineers help to move and document industrial waste that requires special handling at landfills across the U.S. SunDown RunDown attendees might recall that Wastebits pitched at the Canton event at Fox & Hound in February of 2015.

Dan Collins has built a national waste-management business right in the middle of downtown Akron — without a bit of mess, smell or even truck traffic.He and his team of software engineers help to move and document industrial waste that requires special handling at landfills across the U.S.Collins, who spent more than 20 years managing landfills and waste services, started Akron-based Wastebits in 2013. He saw a need on the part of industrial waste generators, their service providers and landfills around the country to connect with each other and to share the documentation required for "special" waste, which is generated by industry and can include anything from asbestos to plastic scrap or sludge.So Collins found some software engineers and a little help from folks in similar industries — including Rob Heiser, CEO of the Akron-based data firm Segmint — and designed an online tool to generate, track and manage all of the documentation needed to manage special waste."We're the guy who sits in the middle of the entire transaction," Collins said.The service is part Match.com and partly a suite of business documentation software.If a waste generator or service provider needs to find a place to handle a specific type of waste, the system shows them which landfills or other service providers will take it. You can't just show up at a landfill with a truckload of industrial sludge or old plastic resins, Collins explained. You have to take certain types of waste to specific landfills equipped and approved to handle it safely. With a keyword search, Wastebits can show users a list of landfills that can handle their needs.But what Wastebits does that might be even more important is generate the documentation necessary to take the waste to the landfill. Every time a generator produces special waste, a "profile" of that waste must be created and retained by the landfill so that it knows what it has taken in. That paperwork can be mountainous, and it must be shared and co-managed among several parties as generators, brokers, haulers and landfills all work together, Collins said.He seems to be on to something. Collins won't say what the company's revenues are, but he points to the top of his computer screen while giving a demonstration of his product.It read 40,479."That's how many subscribers we have right now," Collins explained.The system's facility locator is currently getting more than a million hits per month, he added.Each subscriber pays between $50 and $250 a month to use the service, depending upon their subscription, Collins said.Not bad market penetration for three years of work, and Collins said the number is still growing quickly. He's had to constantly staff up to maintain and expand his product and now employs 28 people. Eighteen of them work at Wastebit's downtown headquarters. The rest work remotely."I'm constantly looking for software developers," Collins said. "We're trying to hire as we speak."Customers apparently like what they've seen in Wastebits so far."It works great for things like remediation projects where you have multiple pieces of information you have to manage," said Bruce Schmucker, vice president of engineering and environmental affairs for Clark Ford Landfill in Jeffersonville, Ind.Schmucker, who until recently worked for small, independent landfills and waste haulers, said Wastbit's documentation system provides a level of sophistication that most small companies don't have on their own."It provides a system that allows these smaller companies to manage their special waste information, with their clients, and provides a repository for everything to be stored and managed … It's a slick system," Schmucker said.Mike Templin, a special waste accounts manager for Fort Worth, Texas-based Waste Connections, said he also relies on Wastebits' documentation system."Once the waste generator submits the profile, all notifications are electronic and they go to me, my assistant at the landfill that manages paperwork, my engineering group that does the profiles — and it's all automated," Templin said."I can tell you there's not another system that's currently in use that has the functionality of Wastebit's or is as user-friendly," Templin said, swearing to have no stake in the company or Collins personally, with a laugh.Such reactions likely mean more growth for Collins, whose challenge now might be finding enough technical help to keep up. He said being downtown makes that a bit easier, as most of his workers are young and enjoy the amenities of the city's center. His offices are in the city-owned Hamlin Building, on Water Street and a stone's through from the Towpath Trail, Akron's canal locks and the Canal Park baseball stadium."We get plenty of opportunities to move out of state. But I love Northeast Ohio, and our team is committed to supporting downtown Akron," Collins said.

Read more: SunDown RunDown Canton alum Wastebits featured in Crain's Business URL: http://www.crainscleveland.com/article/20170129/NEWS/170129818/wastebits-brings-tech-to-the-trash-industry


Mechanics Bank Vice President Sally Gesouras was honored as the winner of the 2016 Athena Award during the Richland Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual meeting and dinner Thursday. The other two finalists were Jodie Perry and Annamarie Fernyak.

Mechanics Bank Vice President Sally Gesouras was honored as the winner of the 2016 Athena Award during the Richland Area Chamber of Commerce’s annual meeting and dinner Thursday.Pam Siegenthaler, who worked for Mansfield Typewriter then made a career in the community service sector heading up the Richland County Foundation, won the 2016 Chairman’s Award.Extraordinary Leadership Awards went to Fred Boll, executive director of the Little Buckeye Museum, Richland County Convention and Visitors Bureau meeting and marketing director Kim Miers, and David Eichinger of Merrill Lynch, who helped the MedCentral Health Systems board make the transition in its merger with OhioHealth, the state’s third largest hospital system.The dinner was at the Kehoe Center in Shelby.Gesouras, assistant vice president for commercial lending for Mechanics Bank, graduated from both the Mansfield and Ashland Leadership Unlimited programs, and was a past TWIN honoree.“For over 25 years, Sally has acted as a visible and active community member throughout the Mansfield-Richland County area,” said former Athena winner Becky Toomey.Gesouras “has supported the advancement of business women, not only in the banking industry, but also the many community boards and activities in which she is involved, including Altrusa International of Mansfield, Catalyst Life Services, North Central State College Foundation, Braintree, Lexington Soccer Association, and is a member of the Women’s Fund Committee through the Richland County Foundation,” Toomey said.Gesouras also serves as a pillar co-chair for United Way of Richland County and is involved in the the Mansfield YMCA’s 150th anniversary celebration.Gayle Gorman Green, who nominated Gesouras, was quoted as saying chances are good that if there is a community event in Mansfield, “Sally will be there.”Athena Award recipients have achieved a high level of excellence in their professions, and serve as strong examples of female leaders for all who work with them, said past Athena Award winner Melanie Riggleman.“Sally is a connector — of people, businesses and organizations. She’s always looking for ways that she can help people move ahead in life and she does so with a generous attitude,” Riggleman said.“She contributes an incredible amount of time and energy to improve the quality of life for others in the community through the many boards she serves, supporting education, entrepreneurs, women and those with developmental disabilities within the community, among other groups. She is passionate about helping all members of the community, especially women, to realize their full leadership potential,” she added.Two semi-finalists for the Athena Award, Annamarie Fernyak and Jodie A. Perry, also were honored Wednesday night.

Read more: Braintree board chair Sally Gesouras receives Athena Award. Board member Jodie Perry also a nominee URL: http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/story/news/local/achievement/2017/01/26/sally-gesouras-wins-2016-athena-award/97097584/


The 10th annual Groundhog Day International Trade Forecast Breakfast will take place at 7:30 a.m. Jan. 27 in the Science and Advanced Technology Center of Kent State University Tuscarawas, The sponsors are ChemSpec Ltd., Economic Development and Finance Alliance of Tuscarawas County, and Braintree Business Development Center of Mansfield and Canton.

The 10th annual Groundhog Day International Trade Forecast Breakfast will take place at 7:30 a.m. Jan. 27 in the Science and Advanced Technology Center of Kent State University Tuscarawas, 330 University Drive NE, New Philadelphia.The presenter will be Michael Weidokal, of International Strategic Analysis. Weidokal is an expert in international opportunities, demographics and markets. He will discuss current trends, markets and economies of potential export targets.The event will end by 9:30 a.m. A full, hot breakfast buffet will be offered, and the entire program will be free.To RSVP by Jan. 25, contact Bob Cohen at 419-525-1614 or bcohen@braintreepartners.org or visit conta.cc/2ePORiB.SUBMITTED BY KENT STATE UNIVERSITY TUSCARAWAS

Read more: EDFA of Tuscarawas, ChemSpec, and Braintree bring Groundhog Day International Trade Forecast Breakfast to KSU Tuscarawas URL: http://www.timesreporter.com/news/20170123/groundhog-day-trade-forecast-breakfast-set-for-jan-27